Pantalica

Pantalica and the earth element

“Earth” is a very important element for discovering the memory and identity of this archaeological site, where lush nature retreats to welcome the humans who populated it and their history.
Veduta PantalicaPantalica is a peaceful place where plane trees, poplars, orange blossoms and many other species of plants and flowers offer life, colour and fragrance along the paths of the nature reserve.
This territory was once the site of a large settlement. Numerous round or elliptical huts made of straw and branches were distributed on the high ground of this great prehistoric city. The necropolises, cities of the dead, unfolded on the sides of the mountain, while one of the highest points of the area was the Acropolis of Pantalica, where the “prince’s palace” was built: the Anaktoron .
Resti Anaktoron
What remains of this ancient city and its first inhabitants is a spectacular necropolis: a cemetery of more than 5,000 tombs dug into the mountainside. This particular type of tomb is called “a grotticella” (cave-like).
The grottoes were small chambers dug into the limestone with an opening to the outside, formerly covered by a decorated stone slab.

A Pantalica si trovano cinque grandi necropoli composte da più di 5.000 tombe scavate sul pendio delle montagne. Queste tombe, molto diffuse in Sicilia e realizzate tra il XII e l’VIII secolo a.C., sono chiamate tombe “a grotticella” e la loro particolarità risiede proprio nella loro forma. L’accesso alla minuscola tomba avviene attraverso un corridoio scavato nella roccia. Il corridoio è molto stretto all'ingresso e più largo verso l’interno. La maggior parte delle tombe, di forma circolare o ellittica, è di piccole dimensioni, del diametro in media di circa 1,50 m. Esse presentano di solito una volta convessa che ricorda una grotta. L’apertura verso l’esterno, anticamente coperta da una lastra di pietra decorata, è spesso tanto piccola che, per poter entrare, è necessario piegarsi. Ognuna delle tombe poteva ospitare uno o più scheletri, accompagnati da oggetti di uso quotidiano, vasi e pendagli di cui gli uomini e le donne si adornavano.
A Pantalica si trovano cinque grandi necropoli composte da più di 5.000 tombe scavate sul pendio delle montagne. Queste tombe, molto diffuse in Sicilia e realizzate tra il XII e l’VIII secolo a.C., sono chiamate tombe “a grotticella” e la loro particolarità risiede proprio nella loro forma. L’accesso alla minuscola tomba avviene attraverso un corridoio scavato nella roccia. Il corridoio è molto stretto all'ingresso e più largo verso l’interno. La maggior parte delle tombe, di forma circolare o ellittica, è di piccole dimensioni, del diametro in media di circa 1,50 m. Esse presentano di solito una volta convessa che ricorda una grotta. L’apertura verso l’esterno, anticamente coperta da una lastra di pietra decorata, è spesso tanto piccola che, per poter entrare, è necessario piegarsi. Ognuna delle tombe poteva ospitare uno o più scheletri, accompagnati da oggetti di uso quotidiano, vasi e pendagli di cui gli uomini e le donne si adornavano.

Each one could house many skeletons, as well as everyday objects, vases and pendants worn by the men and women.
Thanks to the numerous excavations, very important traces have emerged from the necropolises and underground, reconstructing the history of the ancient civilisation of Pantalica. Weapons, colourful vases, mirrors, fibulae and other artefacts are now kept at the Paolo Orsi Archaeological Museum in Syracuse. Each object represents a magic key to a story. It is only thanks to these discoveries preserved in the earth that today we can imagine and reconstruct the life that took place in mysterious places like the site of Pantalica!

The Neapolis

Giudecca and air. The Basilica of San Giovannello

Giudecca and the earth element. Between gardens and artisan workshops

The fountain of Diana in Piazza Archimede

Pantalica and fire. The Metal Age: objects from the culture of Pantalica

Ortygia and the air element. The Gods of Olympus and the Temple of Apollo.

Ortygia

Pantalica and the earth element

The Cathedral of Syracuse

Giudecca

Nature in Neapolis

A journey to Pantalica

Neapolis and fire. The Altar of Hieron and the sacrificial fire

Neapolis and the water element. The Nymphaeum

Pantalica and air. The skies of Pantalica: from hawks to bats

The naumachiae: naval battles at the theatre

Giudecca and fire. Cooking and the Jewish religion

The interior of the Cathedral of Syracuse

Giudecca and water. The ritual baths: the Casa Bianca mikveh

Ortygia and water. The Fountain of Arethusa

Neapolis and the air element. The Ear of Dionysius

Pantalica and water: the Myth of the Anapo River

Neapolis and the earth element. Places of performance: the Greek theatre and the Roman amphitheatre

Ortygia and fire. Archimedes and the invention of the burning mirrors

Ortygia and the earth element. Piazza del Duomo: discovering the origins.