WHL

Criteria for including Syracuse and the Rocky Necropolis of Pantalica in the WHL

The sites and monuments of Syracuse/Pantalica form a “whole” that constitutes a unique collection and extraordinary testimony of Mediterranean cultures throughout the centuries and in the same space. The Syracuse/Pantalica group also offers, through its cultural diversity, an exceptional testimony to the development of civilisation over 3 millennia.
The extraordinary cultural traditions that developed in these places profoundly influenced the subsequent civilisations in the area, radiating throughout the Mediterranean, and represent a model on which the entire civilisation of the Western world has been based and evolved to the present day.
The group of monuments and archaeological sites situated in Syracuse (between the nucleus of Ortygia and the vestiges located throughout the urban area) is the finest example of architectural creation encompassing several cultural influences (Greek, Roman, medieval and Baroque).
The stratification in the territory of all the cultures in the Mediterranean since prehistoric times represents a significant example of the integration of cultures, styles and building techniques from different eras which, also by virtue of their exceptional degree of preservation, represent an extraordinary documentary basis for the analysis and historical and scientific discovery of the systems and building techniques from different eras and civilisations. Ancient Syracuse was directly linked to events, ideas and literary works of universal importance.
The poems, plays and literary works that were composed and performed in Syracuse were great in number and of outstanding and universal value and still form part of the cultural heritage shared by all Western civilisation today.
The cultural, architectural and artistic stratification evident in the Syracuse/Pantalica ensemble bears exceptional testimony to the history and cultural diversity of the Syracuse region over three millennia from the ancient Greek period to the Baroque.

Criteria for inscription in the WHL
Criterion (II): The ensemble of sites and monuments in Syracuse/Pantalica constitutes a remarkable testimony of the Mediterranean cultures over the centuries.
Criterion (III): The Syracuse/Pantalica ensemble offers, through its remarkable cultural diversity, an exceptional testimony to the development of civilisations over three millennia.
Criterion (IV): The group of monuments and archaeological sites situated in Syracuse (between the nucleus of Ortygia and the vestiges located throughout the urban area) is the finest example of outstanding architectural creation encompassing several cultural influences (Greek, Roman and Baroque).
Criterion (VI): Ancient Syracuse was directly linked to events, ideas and literary works of outstanding universal significance.

The Culture of Pantalica

Pantalica and fire. The Metal Age: objects from the culture of Pantalica

The Cathedral of Syracuse

Legends and magic echoes in the Latomie of Syracuse

Byzantine Pantalica

The Athenaion of the tyrant Gelon

The Cathedral of Syracuse

The catacombs of San Giovanni

Giudecca and air. The Basilica of San Giovannello

The Neapolis

Castello Maniace

Ortygia. Venus rising from the waters of the port

The interior of the Cathedral of Syracuse

Crypt of San Marciano

Pantalica: where nature and history merge

The cultural significance of tragedy

The Altar of Hieron II: Blood and fire place

The Roman Amphitheatre

King Hyblon’s kingdom: Pantalica, between history and legend

The fountain of Diana in Piazza Archimede

The architecture of the Piazza

Pantalica and air. The skies of Pantalica: from hawks to bats

Ortygia

The Church of San Giovanni alle Catacombe

Syracuse during the tyranny of Dionysius

The Euryalus Fortress

Giudecca and the earth element. Between gardens and artisan workshops

Neapolis and the water element. The Nymphaeum

The Gladiator performances

Giudecca and water. The ritual baths: the Casa Bianca mikveh

The Ear of Dionysius and the Grotta dei Cordari

Inside the Cathedral of Ortygia

Neapolis and the earth element. Places of performance: the Greek theatre and the Roman amphitheatre

The Museion and the Grotta del Ninfeo

The Church of St. Lucia to the Abbey

Giudecca and fire. Cooking and the Jewish religion

Neapolis and fire. The Altar of Hieron and the sacrificial fire

The naumachiae: naval battles at the theatre

The Dionysian Walls: a masterpiece of Greek engineering

Nature in Neapolis

Ortygia and water. The Fountain of Arethusa

The Venationes

Traces of Christianity in Syracuse

Where seas and civilisations meet

Pantalica and water: the Myth of the Anapo River

Piazza del Duomo, a sacred place of the ancient Greeks

The Senatorial Palace

Pantalica and the earth element

The Greek Theatre of Syracuse

Neapolis from past to present

Ortygia and the air element. The Gods of Olympus and the Temple of Apollo.

Roman Syracuse, a military power thanks to the genius of Archimedes

Ortygia and fire. Archimedes and the invention of the burning mirrors

The functions of Castello Maniace

Ortygia and the earth element. Piazza del Duomo: discovering the origins.

Criteria for including Syracuse and the Rocky Necropolis of Pantalica in the WHL

The Jews, a wandering people

Neapolis and the air element. The Ear of Dionysius

The Spanish fortification

A journey to Pantalica

Temple of Apollo

Giudecca

Giudecca, the hidden Jewish heart of Syracuse